Manual Therapy Forum

The Essentials of Spinal Manipulation with Peter Gibbons and Philip Tehan

Wanting to master your skills at manipulation? Well, then look no further! This is the course you want to attend! This course is taught by world-reknown authors and clinicians Peter Gibbons and Philip Tehan. If you are unfamiliar with them, their book Manipulation of the Spine, Thorax, and Pelvis is a MUST OWN. Peter and Philip teach in only a few places here in the U.S. So, why not come to Chico, CA and learn from the best? It will be a great time of learning and perfecting our craft, so come join us! If you have questions, please contact me.

Here is a link to the registration page http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07eg259pxgebaaf6db&llr=4rjqtapab

Bill Temes PT, MS, OCS, COMT, FAAOMPT

There’s no question about the fact that, to do the skill is not that hard. Anybody can learn to manipulate, or mobilize, or do just about anything. I’ve always said you can teach most animals to do these things as well, but being able to determine who needs what and whether or not it’s safe to have that applied to them.

Bill Temes

The way we approach patients, and the way we think about them as a whole human being, and not just a tendinitis or a discal problem or whatever… we need to consider the whole individual, and treat the whole individual… and develop your expertise as best you can to be able to do that. I think manual therapy gives us the great opportunity to do that.

Bill Temes

You’ll know that you’ve really come a long way and developed a great deal of skill when you’ve been told by your patients that “you have very soft hands”. And whenever someone says that to me, I always think “I’ve come a long way!”

Bill Temes quoting David Lamb

Welcome to our latest podcast featuring Bill Temes! I first met Bill several years ago while taking a NAIOMT class he was instructing with my friend Kent Keyser. It was most certainly a wonderful time as Kent and Bill are good friends and teach well together, but also because of the knowledge and skill they possess. As you will hear, Bill is an instructor and examiner for NAIOMT (and has been for many years). He recently retired from direct patient care, but still mentors and teaches. This podcast is filled with some great wisdome and advice as you can tell from the quotes on this page, so listen and enjoy! Cheers!

Listen in here:

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The more chronic the case, the more issues we have to be able to look at.

Bill Temes

The most important thing is to be able to see what’s in front of you. Be able to look at it. And I think, getting back to what we started with earlier, about gait. You can look at someone and get a pretty good idea what some of the biggest issues are. Just evaluating what they’re using to moving forward with, and a lot of people don’t move forward normally. You’ve got to be able to take that apart.

Bill Temes

Make sure you spend time listening to what you’re patients have to tell you, and don’t jump to conclusions about what you think you believe is the problem. The more you talk to them, the more you learn. The more you learn from them each time, the more it’s going to help them as far as being able to walk away much improved… I think we can’t spend enough time in the subjective, and I don’t mean just sitting and talking to them. Even as your continuing to work with somebody, keep asking questions and find out more about the individual themselves.

Bill Temes

Links of interest:

North American Institute of Orthopaedic Manual Therapy

Bill’s NAIOMT email – temes@naiomt.com

Bill’s personal email – wtemes@comcast.com

Shirley Sahrmann PT, PhD, FAPTA

 

 

That to me, is what is so exciting to us as physical therapists.  Because we’re the people that can treat cause rather than consequence.  We’re the people that can help take away the cause rather than treat the symptoms.

– Shirley Sahrmann

 

I think anything that changes a pattern makes people better.

– Shirley Sahrmann

 

 

Welcome back to the podcasts!  This episode features Shirley Sahrmann.  Many of you likely know of Shirley from her research, teachings with Washington University in St. Louis, or her texts for Movement System Impairment Syndromes.  I wanted to speak with Shirley to gain a better perspective on her background and thoughts regarding her point of view.  I’ve noticed more in more in my own practice how much the neuromuscular system and create illusions of mechanical dysfunctions, so had thought that maybe Shirley could provide perspective on that.  Fortunately, Shirley corrected me on my perceptions about what Movement System Impairment Syndromes are.  I’d certainly love to speak with Shirley again about these topics, and more.  Please enjoy and let us know your thoughts!

 

 

Listen in here:

 

Or tune in down here:

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Listen to Stitcher

 

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It’s the adaptations in the periphery that bias the activation in the nervous system.

– Shirley Sahrmann

 

Having your hands on people is an essential part of the examination and the treatment of the patient.

– Shirley Sahrman

 

Links of interest:

Diagnosis and Treatment of Movement Impairment Syndromes

Movement System Impairment Syndromes of the Extremities, Cervical and Thoracic Spines

Washington University in St. Louis MSI Resources

Spotify

Well, some of you asked for it, so here it is… Manual Therapy Forum Podcast is now available on Spotify! Check out all of our episodes on there and let us know what you think.

Cheers!

Crabs In A Bucket

 

I don’t know about you, but I’m a consumer of podcasts.  I love to gain knowledge, information, and inspiration from this form of media.  I was recently listening to an old episode of the The Joe Rogan Experience Podcast and thought this was worth sharing.  What are your thoughts?  I’d love to hear them!

 

They’re like crabs in a bucket.  You know what crabs in a bucket are like?  You have a bunch of crabs in a bucket and one crab tries to get out of the bucket.  Then, the other crabs grab him and pull him down!  That’s what always happens.

 

 

That’s the number one problem with the world… is crabs in a bucket.  The number one problem with this world is people, instead of being inspired, they look to criticize.  People, instead of looking at someone who works hard and does something amazing… and looking at their own life they find fault or they find weakness, or they find themselves not to add up… not to measure up.  So, they get upset and instead of finding that inspiration and saying “You know what?  I do have a belly, I do need to get to the gym.  You know what?  I do drink too much, I gotta stop doing that.”  Instead of that, they just start shitting on this one thing that causes them to feel insecure.  Not even realizing that that one thing has the potential to empower them.

 

 

– Joe Rogan